Romantic Education: Romantic Pedagogies and New Approaches to Teaching Romanticism
NASSR/Romantic Circles Pedagogy Award
Romantic Education: Romantic Pedagogies and New Approaches to Teaching Romanticism
These essays offer diverse ways of thinking about the intersections of Romanticism and pedagogy: both what Romantic-era figures themselves thought about the processes of learning and teaching and also what we as modern educators might consider as we present these texts and figures to our students. It is our hope that they will contribute to ongoing conversations among scholars and teachers of...
The essays in this volume probe the way that Romantic writers explored the limits and possibilities of thinking in terms of systems. The purpose of the collection is not to provide a single perspective adopted by Romantic authors, any more than it is to provide a single theoretical perspective with which to view those authors. Instead, the essays collectively convey a sense that Romantic writers...
NASSR/Romantic Circles Pedagogy Award

2015 Winners Announced

The contest was devised in the hopes of celebrating recent pedagogical innovation, inspiring creative new approaches and creating an additional forum for conversations about Romantic pedagogy—both its boons and challenges.  Teachers of all ranks may submit teaching materials, and a panel of...

This volume of five essays focus on how the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley uses and modifies Gothic conventions across his whole writing career so as, on the one hand, to extend the limits of the Gothic, shading it into a wider Romanticism, and, on the other, to press the limits of the Gothic down to their most basic foundations, releasing new potentials. These essays all argue in different way...

This volume takes as its starting point a 2001 volume in the Romantic Circles Praxis Series, Reading Shelley’s Interventionist Poetry, 1819-1820, in which volume-editor Michael Scrivener, employing Theodor Adorno's terminology, interrogates a potential binary in our understanding of Shelley's "interventionist" work: the "antinomy of commitment and autonomy." Asking what it means for a...

Newest Resources

These essays offer diverse ways of thinking about the intersections of Romanticism and pedagogy: both what Romantic-era figures themselves thought about the processes of learning and teaching and also what we as modern educators might consider as we...
May 2016
The essays in this volume probe the way that Romantic writers explored the limits and possibilities of thinking in terms of systems. The purpose of the collection is not to provide a single perspective adopted by Romantic authors, any more than it...
March 2016

2015 Winners Announced

The contest was devised in the hopes of celebrating recent pedagogical innovation, inspiring creative new approaches and creating an additional...
December 2015

This volume of five essays focus on how the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley uses and modifies Gothic conventions across his whole writing career so as, on the one hand, to extend the limits of the Gothic, shading it into a wider Romanticism, and, on...

November 2015
This volume takes as its starting point a 2001 volume in the Romantic Circles Praxis Series, Reading Shelley’s Interventionist Poetry, 1819-1820, in which volume-editor Michael Scrivener, employing Theodor Adorno's terminology, interrogates...
October 2015

The new Romantic Circles Reviews & Receptions section is an innovative venture in contemporary Romantic scholarship, comprising short reviews of recent work, live BookChats, BookLists, a forum for debate, and an evolving compendium of...

September 2015

News & Announcements from the RC Community

Curating a Blake exhibition: Part 2 << The Cynic Sang
7 hours 13 min ago
Part 1 of Michael Phillips’s description of organizing the Ashmolean Blake exhibition of 2014–15 appeared last week. Here is the continuation. SJ: Once you had the framework of Blake as apprentice and master, how did you determine which other works you wanted to include? What came next? MP: First I needed to see the galleries that would be used for the exhibition. I also needed to obtain a floor... See full post (external link)
Details, Disagreements, and Decisions << The Cynic Sang
2 days 2 hours ago
While finishing up work on a set of Blake’s letters from the Westminster Archives, I ran across a question that has made me a minor expert on a very minor piece of history: the difference between wafers and wax seals in nineteenth century England. My curiosity about the difference in these two methods of sealing letters came about when I encountered the following seal on Blake’s Letter to Mr.... See full post (external link)
Curating a Blake exhibition: Part 1 << The Cynic Sang
1 week 1 day ago
Every so often I publish a Q&A, and today’s guest is Michael Phillips, guest curator of the William Blake: Apprentice & Master exhibition at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, in 2014-15. I had a very murky idea of how an exhibition comes to life, so thought I’d find out. SJ: I’m intrigued by the amount of work that happens behind the scenes to mount such an exhibition. How did it come... See full post (external link)
“only the Contents or Index of already publish’d books” << The Cynic Sang
2 weeks 5 hours ago
Today I published a new version of the journal’s index. I update the index every time we publish an issue, and I don’t usually draw attention to the fact, so you may be wondering what’s special about this occasion. Over the past two or three months, the good people of the Blake Archive team in Rochester have been helping me to add links to items from the issues from... See full post (external link)
Blake’s spectacles << The Cynic Sang
3 weeks 1 hour ago
Blake’s eyeglasses now live at the Fitzwilliam Museum—here’s the museum’s catalogue record. There’s an image of them in the checklist of publications and discoveries that appeared in our spring 1996 issue (vol. 29, no. 4), at p. 141. Today’s poem is by Morton Paley, from the summer 1978 issue: Mr. Blake’s Spectacles At the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge Through... See full post (external link)
The “Manual” Humanities << The Cynic Sang
3 weeks 2 days ago
One of the things we’ve been endlessly debating in our Team Marginalia meetings has been how to “categorize” the various kinds of inscription we’ve found in our examples of Blake’s annotated books. And this is not to mention the ongoing conversation about how to handle text on the page that is not by Blake, such as the original work itself or editorial apparatus such... See full post (external link)

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